Available courses

An introduction to standard molecular biology techniques such as isolation and purification of proteins and nucleic acids, cloning and expression of recombinant proteins with laboratory component. Co-requisite: BIOT 5211L

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Mon 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.     Room: 116.1       Semester: Fall/Spring

Lab Component. The primary objective of this course is for the student to gain an understanding of the metabolic processes in bacteria, plants and animal cells and how metabolism is affected by enzymes, substrates, other metabolites and by bio-production of commercial products.

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Tue 1:30 - 5:30 p.m.          Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR Lab B4

Research hours spent under the supervision of a research advisor. Students work with their research advisor to plan a thesis project and write a thesis proposal. Each hour of course credit translates into a minimum of three hours of lab work per week. 

A comprehensive study of protein chemistry applications and techniques as they relate to biotechnology. The topics covered in this course include protein purification, protein characterization, binding studies and proteomics.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Fri., 9:00a.m. - 5:00p.m.          Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR Lab B4

May be repeated. Research hours spent under the supervision of a research advisor. Students focus on their research project. Each hour of course credit translates into three hours of lab work per week.

Advanced survey of the immune system with focus on the human and mouse models. Covers the origin and differentiation of the hematopoietic system, antibody structure and function, T cell subsets and the function of each subset, and the role of innate and adaptive immunity in the response to infection.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Mon, Wed  9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.          Semester: Summer

Instrumental analysis of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. Methods may include liquid chromatography; UV/Visible spectroscopy; mass spectrometry; X-ray diffraction of proteins and nucleic acids; NMR; Fluorescence cell sorter; CT scanning. 


Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Fri 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.          Semester: Summer

This course offers an introduction to strategic planning and management in health services organizations. Processes and formats employed in strategic planning and marketing are presented and applied in case studies and a final project. Elements of market assessment, environmental analysis and strategy development are presented and applied to course practices. 

This course offers an introduction to strategic planning and management in health services organizations. Processes and formats employed in strategic planning and marketing are presented and applied in case studies and a final project. Elements of market assessment, environmental analysis and strategy development are presented and applied to course practices. 

Given the integration of data, community needs and regulation and policy, this course incorporates the elements of healthcare, public health, health information technology and the health insurance sub-industries to develop a framework and analytic methods to improve efficiency, effectiveness and efficacy of the health industry as a whole.  

The course will establish an analytic framework, based on data from patients, populations, processes and profitability (4 P's of Health Analytics) utilizing industry, healthcare enterprise and community health data with appropriate tools, methods and approaches to answer community health needs and status, operational, financial and healthcare delivery outcomes questions to support leadership decisions. The course will also include an integrated platform of appropriate analytical and predictive/estimation methods, tools and techniques for enhanced decision making at the strategic and operational levels of the health enterprise for enhanced health status and improved health outcomes of communities served. 

Credit Hours: 3                           Class Meets: Tues, 5:30 - 8:30 p.m.                           Semester: Summer

This course is designed to familiarize students with the history and current applications of health communication theory and strategies to public health practice and research. This course examines how to structure, develop and evaluate social marketing, media advocacy, risk communication and advocacy skills for change. In addition, systematic qualitative data collection processes such as interviewing skills, participant observation and focus groups will be developed. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills to help students analyze and utilize these skills in research and practice. 


Credit Hours: 3                                           Class Meets: Mon. 5:30 - 7:30 p.m.                                     Semester: Summer

COMH 6330 is intended to provide MPH students with a solid foundation and understanding of research methods and topics with enhanced capacity to produce and critically appraise public health research and literature. Students will learn the basic concepts and procedures to conduct evidence-based research addressing behavioral/social determinants of health. The course provides a concrete knowledge base to design conceptually sound and methodologically rigorous research proposals and/or evaluate behavioral/social interventions addressing public health problems. It covers a wide range of methodologies from observational studies to randomized controlled trials and non-randomized evaluations. The emphasis will be on developing a methodological literacy that allows students to understand the strengths of various methods and their common uses in public health research. 

This course presents basic statistical concepts and methods commonly used to make evidence-based decisions in business settings, with a focus on healthcare applications. This course will cover commonly used statistical tools needed by healthcare executives. During the course, techniques to collect, summarize, analyze, and interpret business-related data will be reviewed. Topics in this course may include defining and formulating problems, formulating and testing hypotheses, sampling and sampling distributions, creating descriptive statistics, statistical inference and using the results to make decisions. 

Credit Hours: 3          Class Meets: Tues., 6-9 p.m.          Rotation: ODD          Semester: Spring 2020

Classroom: H226
This course will examine the interplay of race, socio-economic status, and interest group politics in the formulation and implementation of U.S. federal and state environmental policy through film (popular film and television, documentaries, etc.). We will consider the proposition that people of color and socio-economically disadvantaged individuals bear a disproportionate burden of environmental pollution and its health consequences. We will consider the viewpoint that within the United States, as well as globally, a pattern of environmental inequity, injustice and racism exists. Key topics to be considered during the course include racism and social justice, environmental racism, pollution impacts and health effects in communities of color and rural communities, risk assessment, community responses to environmental threats, pollution in developing nations, indigenous peoples, and climate change. The possible causes for patterns of injustice and community-led interventions will be examined and discussed.

Credit Hours: 3              Class Meets: Wed. 5:30 - 8:00 p.m.           Semester: Summer     


The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.
The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.
The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
This is a continuation and culmination of the capstone project requirement for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.

This course provides a facilitated curriculum of various technologies including Moodle, Screencast-O-Matic and Teams. The course is a requirement for Online Instructor Certification. 

The Promotor(a) or Community Health Worker Training and Certification Program provides leadership to enhance the development and implementation of statewide training and certification standards and administrative rules for persons who act as promotores or community health workers, instructors and sponsoring institutions/training programs.

An introduction to using Moodle.

Grantsmanship: Getting the Competitive Edge. A slideshow adapted from a PowerPoint presentation given by Dr. Steven Idell to the BMR Faculty on Jan 28, 2003.

Use the enrollment key "Grantsmanship" to self-enroll.

An introduction to using Moodle.

This training is provided and intended for use by The University of Texas System employees and volunteers and personnel of third-party camps using The University of Texas System property for camps and programs for minors. It is derived from Texas state statues as well as policies found within The University of Texas System.
Classroom: Online

All data and forms to assist faculty in advising. 

Educational Curriculum for the Family Medicine rotations

The course offers an in-depth practical and conceptual approach to fundamental statistics.The course consists of learning a variety of procedures commonly used for testing hypotheses, learning to examine and analyze the data accordingly, and learning to communicate the research results to others. By the end of the course the student will be able to create a database, properly code and screen data and present results (SPSS or another statistical software package); determine and describe the strength of association and direction of relationships between two or more variables by identifying and computing appropriate statistical tests, such as chi-square statistics, correlation coefficients, and linear regression models and by writing up results; examine and present significant mean differences between and within groups by identifying and computing appropriate statistical tests, such as t-tests and analysis of variance models (ANOVA) and by writing up results. 

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Tue 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.          Semester: Spring 2019