Available courses

The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.
The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.
The Promotor(a) or Community Health Worker Training and Certification Program provides leadership to enhance the development and implementation of statewide training and certification standards and administrative rules for persons who act as promotores or community health workers, instructors and sponsoring institutions/training programs.

Students in BIOT 5101 will present a research paper or their thesis research progress to faculty and peers. Each student enrolled in BIOT 5331 or BIOT 5332 must present a paper of his/her research each semester enrolled as scheduling permits. Seminars are formal PowerPoint presentations. Students in BIOT 6101 will present their thesis research progress to faculty and peers. Each student enrolled in BIOT 6331 or BIOT 6332 must present his/her research each semester enrolled as scheduling permits. The student should have a committee meeting following the seminar. Seminars are formal PowerPoint presentations in preparation for a thesis defense.



Classroom: via Microsoft Teams

This course exposes students to current research published in major scientific journals. Students will learn how to read and interpret methodologies and results published by other scientists. This course will provide the student with a thorough understanding of the strengths and limitations of scientific writing. This course is the first of a two-course sequence and introduces the student to basic organization of scientific papers and how to identify the questions being addressed based on the scientific method.

Credit hours: 1          Class meets: Mon., 12 - 1 p.m.           Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR 116.1

The goal of the course is to provide a critical understanding of the relationship between structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids.

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Mon., 9 - 11:30 a.m.           Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR 116.1

The goal of the course is to provide a critical understanding of the relationship between structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. The Lab component of this course will give the students hands-on experience in using molecular modeling programs to learn how to manipulate protein structures, performing docking simulations, and graphically display proteins and nucleic acids structures.

 Credit Hours: 2         Class Meets: Mondays, 1:30 - 5:30 p.m.     Format: Hybrid, labs are f2f or virtual

Classroom: Academic Center, G3212

Lecture Component. The primary objective of this course is for the student to gain an understanding of the metabolic processes in bacteria, plants and animal cells and how metabolism is affected by enzymes, substrates, other metabolites and by bio-production of commercial products.

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Tue., 9 - 11:30 a.m.           Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR 116.1

Lab Component. The primary objective of this course is for the student to gain an understanding of the metabolic processes in bacteria, plants and animal cells and how metabolism is affected by enzymes, substrates, other metabolites and by bio-production of commercial products.

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Tue 1:30 - 5:30 p.m.          Semester: Spring

Format: Hybrid, labs are f2f or virtual

Classroom: BMR Lab B4

A comprehensive study of protein chemistry applications and techniques as they relate to biotechnology. The topics covered in this course include protein purification, protein characterization, binding studies and proteomics.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Fri., 9:00a.m. - 5:00p.m.          Semester: Spring

Format: Face to Face

Classroom: BMR Lab B4

May be repeated. Research hours spent under the supervision of a research advisor. Students focus on their research project. Each hour of course credit translates into three hours of lab work per week.

Format: Face to face

This course will develop the foundations of quality and process improvement that lead to higher levels of efficacy, efficiency and effectiveness in health organizations and programs. This course will explore the basis of Quality Improvement (QI) consisting of systematic and continuous actions that lead to measurable improvement in health care services and the health status of targeted patient groups. The methodology of the course will begin with “how things are done now,” considering health care performance as defined by an organization's efficiency and outcome of care, and level of patient satisfaction. Quality is directly linked to an organization's service delivery approach or underlying systems of care throughout the continuum of care. The student will understand that to achieve a different level of performance (i.e., results) and improve quality and efficacy, an organization's current system needs to change. Lastly, this course will focus on a successful QI culture that incorporates the following four key principles: QI work as systems and processes; Focus on patients and community groups, especially rural areas; Focus on being part of the team, and Focus on use of the data and analyses of information.

Credit Hours: 3                   Semester: Fall

This course examines the structure and functioning of the finance components of the public health system. Public health organizations will be discussed within the context of the financial environment that includes financial management, managerial accounting, revenue cycle management and funding and financial management of grants/contracts. The course also examines key financial tools and analyses for financially related decision making within the principles of strategic management applied to public health organizations amid a dynamic changing environment. 

Credit Hours: 3          Class Meets: Tues., 6-9 p.m.         Semester: Spring 2021

Format: Fully Online (First week face-to-face or synchronous online; Second week asynchronous online. May require two face-to-face class sessions. Thursday delivery in Richardson from 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. This class alternates with HPEM 6320.

Classroom: H226

Healthcare professionals benefit from having the knowledge and skills necessary to make informed decisions regarding health services. This course is intended to introduce the foundation of knowledge and skills students need to understand the conceptual and methodological issues of health research methods. Topics include but are not limited to: study conceptualization; research question and hypothesis formation; fundamentals of sampling, observation and measurement; research design and operationalization; secondary data analysis widely used in empirical health services research; interpreting research literature; and the capacity to translate knowledge into action. 

Class Meets: Tues., 6 - 9 p.m.

Format: Fully online with first week asynchronous online; second week face-to-face or synchronous online. May require two face-to-face class sessions. Thursday delivery in Richardson 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. This class alternates with HPEM 6310. 

This course examines the dynamic nature of health economics and policy in addition to understanding the political process in the healthcare and public health context. This course uses foundational economic concepts to develop health economic applications and processes. The course will review important studies in medical research, epidemiology, public health and other fields as they relate to the economics of health care. An overview of the process of policymaking with excerpts from congressional testimony, proposed rules and executive orders will be covered.

Class Meets: Wed., 6 - 9 p.m.
Format: Fully online with first week face-to-face or synchronous online; second week asynchronous online. May require two face-to-face class sessions. This class alternates with PBHL 5330. 

Given the integration of data, community needs and regulation and policy, this course incorporates the elements of healthcare, public health, health information technology and the health insurance sub-industries to develop a framework and analytic methods to improve efficiency, effectiveness and efficacy of the health industry as a whole.  

The course will establish an analytic framework, based on data from patients, populations, processes and profitability (4 P's of Health Analytics) utilizing industry, healthcare enterprise and community health data with appropriate tools, methods and approaches to answer community health needs and status, operational, financial and healthcare delivery outcomes questions to support leadership decisions. The course will also include an integrated platform of appropriate analytical and predictive/estimation methods, tools and techniques for enhanced decision making at the strategic and operational levels of the health enterprise for enhanced health status and improved health outcomes of communities served. 

Credit Hours: 3                           Class Meets: Tues, 5:30 - 8:30 p.m.                           Semester: Summer

This course examines operational issues in healthcare management. Topics include systems analysis, continuous quality improvement and re-engineering, demand forecasting, facility location and design models, decision analysis techniques, linear programming, queuing and waiting models, inventory control models and statistical quality control. The goal is to instill an understanding of the language applications and limitations of quantitative models regarding decision-making and problem-solving in healthcare organizations. 

Class Day: Monday, 6 - 9 p.m.                 Format: Fully Online (First Week Face to Face or Synchronous Online; Second Week Asynchronous Online) May require two Face to Face class sessions. 

Delivering care to meet the needs of the community, a health organization service requires a strategic approach and an organizational culture that attends to those healthcare needs. This course is designed to familiarize students with the current applications of social and behavioral sciences. It is an overview of health care and public health management and administration, managerial decision making, and the practical knowledge, tools, processes and strategies required to operate successfully with a population health focus by the healthcare organization.  

Class Meets: Wed., 6 - 9 p.m.

Format: First week synchronous online, second week asynchronous online, etc., Will coordinate meetings with OEHS 6324, HPEM 6350 and PBHL 5330. 

This course introduces the methods for analyzing biomedical and health-related data using ANOVA methods. The course will involve one-way and two-way ANOVA with fixed and/or random effects and sample size/power calculation. And Logistic and Poisson regression models will also be addressed. The students will learn how to apply SAS procedures PROC POWER, PROC GLM, PROC MIXED, PROC GENMOD, PROC LOGISTIC and PROC GLIMMIX and interpret the results of the analysis. Emphasis will also be placed on the development of critical thinking skills. 

Class Meets: Tuesday, 6 - 9 p.m.

Format: First week asynchronous online, second week synchronous online, etc. Will coordinate meetings with HPEM 6310 and HPEM 6320.

The course offers an in-depth practical and conceptual approach to fundamental statistics. The course consists of learning a variety of procedures commonly used for testing hypotheses, learning to examine and analyze the data accordingly, and learning to communicate the research results to others. By the end of the course the student will be able to create a database, properly code and screen data and present results (SPSS or another statistical software package); determine and describe the strength of association and direction of relationships between two or more variables by identifying and computing appropriate statistical tests, such as chi-square statistics, correlation coefficients, and linear regression models and by writing up results; examine and present significant mean differences between and within groups by identifying and computing appropriate statistical tests, such as t-tests and analysis of variance models (ANOVA) and by writing up results. 

Credit Hours: 3          Class meets: Mon 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.             Semester: Spring 2021

Format: First week synchronous online, second asynchronous online, etc. Will coordinate meetings with OEHS 5340 and HPEM 6392


Classroom: H105

The course provides a comprehensive introduction and overview to health policy, administration and management with specific emphasis on public health and healthcare organizations that deliver care. An additional focus is on rural communities within the context of health administration. The course context is based on managerial decision making and the practical knowledge, tools, processes and strategies required by organizational management. This course overviews the basics of administration, including public health law, human resources management, budgeting and financing, health information management, performance measurement and improvement, ethics, leadership, communication, media relations, and legislative relations. Emerging areas of public health policy and management are also discussed as contexts to apply practical knowledge, tools, and strategies.

Credit Hours: 3               Class Meets: Wed., 6 - 9 p.m.               Semester: Spring 2021

Format: Fully online with first week asynchronous online; second week face-to-face or synchronous online. May require two face-to-face class sessions. This class alternates with HPEM 6350.


Classroom: H226
This course provides an overview of public health issues in rural populations and is designed to give students an understanding of the influence of rurality on health. Topics covered include rural health disparities, policy directions in rural health, and models of rural health service delivery. Practical public health strategies that lessen the severity of impact on rural populations related to lack of access to care, substance abuse, mental health, farm safety and unintentional injuries will be explored.

Credit Hours: 3          Class Meets: Mon., 6-9 p.m.           Semester: Spring 2021
Format: First asynchronous online, second week synchronous online, et. Will coordinate meetings with PBHL 5317 and HPEM 6392.
Classroom: H105

This course is an introductory graduate course that focuses on the impact of chemicals in the environment on global health, including global climate change, energy issues, and the impact on special populations including children, those living in border communities and underserved populations. The impact of global environmental changes on human health will be the focus. 

Semester: Spring 2021                                              Class Meets: Thurs., 6 - 9 p.m.

Format: Online with one face-to-face meeting for presentations. 

The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.
The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.
The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
The Promotor(a) or Community Health Worker Training and Certification Program provides leadership to enhance the development and implementation of statewide training and certification standards and administrative rules for persons who act as promotores or community health workers, instructors and sponsoring institutions/training programs.
This training is provided and intended for use by The University of Texas System employees and volunteers and personnel of third-party camps using The University of Texas System property for camps and programs for minors. It is derived from Texas state statues as well as policies found within The University of Texas System.
Classroom: Online

All data and forms to assist faculty in advising. 

Educational Curriculum for the Family Medicine rotations

The course offers an in-depth practical and conceptual approach to fundamental statistics.The course consists of learning a variety of procedures commonly used for testing hypotheses, learning to examine and analyze the data accordingly, and learning to communicate the research results to others. By the end of the course the student will be able to create a database, properly code and screen data and present results (SPSS or another statistical software package); determine and describe the strength of association and direction of relationships between two or more variables by identifying and computing appropriate statistical tests, such as chi-square statistics, correlation coefficients, and linear regression models and by writing up results; examine and present significant mean differences between and within groups by identifying and computing appropriate statistical tests, such as t-tests and analysis of variance models (ANOVA) and by writing up results. 

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Tue 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.          Semester: Spring 2019