Available courses

Students in BIOT 5101 will present a research paper or their thesis research progress to faculty and peers. Each student enrolled in BIOT 5331 or BIOT 5332 must present a paper of his/her research each semester enrolled as scheduling permits. Seminars are formal PowerPoint presentations. Students in BIOT 6101 will present their thesis research progress to faculty and peers. Each student enrolled in BIOT 6331 or BIOT 6332 must present his/her research each semester enrolled as scheduling permits. The student should have a committee meeting following the seminar. Seminars are formal PowerPoint presentations in preparation for a thesis defense.



Classroom: via Microsoft Teams

This course exposes students to current research published in major scientific journals. Students will learn how to read and interpret methodologies and results published by other scientists. This course will provide the student with a thorough understanding of the strengths and limitations of scientific writing. This course is the first of a two-course sequence and introduces the student to basic organization of scientific papers and how to identify the questions being addressed based on the scientific method.

Credit hours: 1          Class meets: Mon., 12 - 1 p.m.           Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR 116.1

The goal of the course is to provide a critical understanding of the relationship between structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids.

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Mon., 9 - 11:30 a.m.           Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR 116.1

The goal of the course is to provide a critical understanding of the relationship between structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. The Lab component of this course will give the students hands-on experience in using molecular modeling programs to learn how to manipulate protein structures, performing docking simulations, and graphically display proteins and nucleic acids structures.

 Credit Hours: 2         Class Meets: Mondays, 1:30 - 5:30 p.m.     Format: Hybrid, labs are f2f or virtual

Classroom: Academic Center, G3212

Lecture Component. The primary objective of this course is for the student to gain an understanding of the metabolic processes in bacteria, plants and animal cells and how metabolism is affected by enzymes, substrates, other metabolites and by bio-production of commercial products.

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Tue., 9 - 11:30 a.m.           Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR 116.1

Lab Component. The primary objective of this course is for the student to gain an understanding of the metabolic processes in bacteria, plants and animal cells and how metabolism is affected by enzymes, substrates, other metabolites and by bio-production of commercial products.

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Tue 1:30 - 5:30 p.m.          Semester: Spring

Format: Hybrid, labs are f2f or virtual

Classroom: BMR Lab B4

A comprehensive study of protein chemistry applications and techniques as they relate to biotechnology. The topics covered in this course include protein purification, protein characterization, binding studies and proteomics.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Fri., 9:00a.m. - 5:00p.m.          Semester: Spring

Format: Face to Face

Classroom: BMR Lab B4

May be repeated. Research hours spent under the supervision of a research advisor. Students focus on their research project. Each hour of course credit translates into three hours of lab work per week.

Format: Face to face

Advanced survey of the immune system with focus on the human and mouse models. Covers the origin and differentiation of the hematopoietic system, antibody structure and function, T cell subsets and the function of each subset, and the role of innate and adaptive immunity in the response to infection.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Mon, Wed  9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.          Semester: Summer

Basic cell culture techniques with a focus on mammalian cell lines. The course will cover the basic requirements of cells grown in culture, sterile technique for handling cells and methods for transforming and separating cells. 


Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Mon, Thu*  9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.          Semester: Summer

*Thursday class time will only be for passaging cells, as may be required.

Instrumental analysis of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. Methods may include liquid chromatography; UV/Visible spectroscopy; mass spectrometry; X-ray diffraction of proteins and nucleic acids; NMR; Fluorescence cell sorter; CT scanning. 


Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Fri 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.          Semester: Summer

This course focuses on functions and concepts required for managing human resources in organizations. It combines traditional human resource management (HRM) functions with concepts from organization behavior. Course content includes selection, training and development, compensation, performance appraisal, motivation, organization development, union activity and modes of conflict resolution. 

A required residency/internship provides an opportunity for each student to work in a health administration settings in a position that carries responsibility. A minimum number of hours of effort is expected during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course (as per the instructor). 

A required residency/internship provides an opportunity for each student to work in a health administration settings in a position that carries responsibility. A minimum number of hours of effort is expected during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course (as per the instructor). 

A required residency/internship provides an opportunity for each student to work in a health administration settings in a position that carries responsibility. A minimum number of hours of effort is expected during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course (as per the instructor). 

A required residency/internship provides an opportunity for each student to work in a health administration settings in a position that carries responsibility. A minimum number of hours of effort is expected during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course (as per the instructor). 

A required residency/internship provides an opportunity for each student to work in a health administration settings in a position that carries responsibility. A minimum number of hours of effort is expected during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course (as per the instructor). 

A required residency/internship provides an opportunity for each student to work in a health administration settings in a position that carries responsibility. A minimum number of hours of effort is expected during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course (as per the instructor). 

A required residency/internship provides an opportunity for each student to work in a health administration settings in a position that carries responsibility. A minimum number of hours of effort is expected during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course (as per the instructor). 

Given the integration of data, community needs and regulation and policy, this course incorporates the elements of healthcare, public health, health information technology and the health insurance sub-industries to develop a framework and analytic methods to improve efficiency, effectiveness and efficacy of the health industry as a whole.  

The course will establish an analytic framework, based on data from patients, populations, processes and profitability (4 P's of Health Analytics) utilizing industry, healthcare enterprise and community health data with appropriate tools, methods and approaches to answer community health needs and status, operational, financial and healthcare delivery outcomes questions to support leadership decisions. The course will also include an integrated platform of appropriate analytical and predictive/estimation methods, tools and techniques for enhanced decision making at the strategic and operational levels of the health enterprise for enhanced health status and improved health outcomes of communities served. 

Credit Hours: 3                           Class Meets: Tues, 5:30 - 8:30 p.m.                           Semester: Summer

The capstone project is a requirement for students in the MHA program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on projects that are developed in consultation with a faculty member. 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the history and current applications of social and behavioral sciences as they are applied to public health practice and research. It explores social and behavioral science models, theories, and approaches that inform public health, and their philosophical roots. The course also examines social and behavioral determinants of health equity across the ecological spectrum. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills to help students synthesize and utilize information in research and practice. An important contribution of this course is the emphasis on recognizing the contributions of social and behavioral science research and practice to enhance public health.

Credit hours: 3                  Semester: Summer 2021

Classroom: H104
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the principles and practices of infectious diseases epidemiology with focus on how the presence and control of communicable diseases affects public health locally, nationally and internationally. Topics to be covered include: 1) general principles of infectious diseases epidemiology, including outbreak investigation surveillance, analysis of infectious diseases data, and laboratory testing of specimens; 2) major modes of infectious disease transmission, including airborne, food and water, zoonotic, insect vector, blood, and sexual transmission; 3) different control strategies for infectious diseases, including infection control, antimicrobial management, immunization, risk factor modification and screening; 4) the practical application of epidemiologic tools for the understanding and control of infectious diseases.
This course will examine the interplay of race, socio-economic status, and interest group politics in the formulation and implementation of U.S. federal and state environmental policy through film (popular film and television, documentaries, etc.). We will consider the proposition that people of color and socio-economically disadvantaged individuals bear a disproportionate burden of environmental pollution and its health consequences. We will consider the viewpoint that within the United States, as well as globally, a pattern of environmental inequity, injustice and racism exists. Key topics to be considered during the course include racism and social justice, environmental racism, pollution impacts and health effects in communities of color and rural communities, risk assessment, community responses to environmental threats, pollution in developing nations, indigenous peoples, and climate change. The possible causes for patterns of injustice and community-led interventions will be examined and discussed.

Credit Hours: 3                        Semester: Summer     


The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.
The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.
The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.
The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.
The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
The Promotor(a) or Community Health Worker Training and Certification Program provides leadership to enhance the development and implementation of statewide training and certification standards and administrative rules for persons who act as promotores or community health workers, instructors and sponsoring institutions/training programs.

All data and forms to assist faculty in advising. 

Educational Curriculum for the Family Medicine rotations