Available courses

Research hours spent under the supervision of a research advisor. Students work with their research advisor to plan a thesis project and write a thesis proposal. Each hour of course credit translates into a minimum of three hours of lab work per week. 

May be repeated. Research hours spent under the supervision of a research advisor. Students focus on their research project. Each hour of course credit translates into three hours of lab work per week.

Advanced survey of the immune system with focus on the human and mouse models. Covers the origin and differentiation of the hematopoietic system, antibody structure and function, T cell subsets and the function of each subset, and the role of innate and adaptive immunity in the response to infection.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Mon, Wed  9:00a.m. - 11:30a.m.          Semester: Summer

Basic cell culture techniques with a focus on mammalian cell lines. The course will cover the basic requirements of cells grown in culture, sterile technique for handling cells and methods for transforming and separating cells. 


Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Mon, Thu*  9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.          Semester: Summer

*Thursday class time will only be for passaging cells, as may be required.

Instrumental analysis of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. Methods may include liquid chromatography; UV/Visible spectroscopy; mass spectrometry; X-ray diffraction of proteins and nucleic acids; NMR; Fluorescence cell sorter; CT scanning. 


Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Fri 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.          Semester: Summer

Given the integration of data, community needs and regulation and policy, this course incorporates the elements of healthcare, public health, health information technology and the health insurance sub-industries to develop a framework and analytic methods to improve efficiency, effectiveness and efficacy of the health industry as a whole.  

The course will establish an analytic framework, based on data from patients, populations, processes and profitability (4 P's of Health Analytics) utilizing industry, healthcare enterprise and community health data with appropriate tools, methods and approaches to answer community health needs and status, operational, financial and healthcare delivery outcomes questions to support leadership decisions. The course will also include an integrated platform of appropriate analytical and predictive/estimation methods, tools and techniques for enhanced decision making at the strategic and operational levels of the health enterprise for enhanced health status and improved health outcomes of communities served. 

Credit Hours: 3                           Class Meets: Tues, 5:30 - 8:30 p.m.                           Semester: Summer

This course is designed to familiarize students with the history and current applications of social and behavioral sciences as they are applied to public health practice and research. It explores social and behavioral science models, theories, and approaches that inform public health, and their philosophical roots. The course also examines social and behavioral determinants of health equity across the ecological spectrum. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills to help students synthesize and utilize information in research and practice. An important contribution of this course is the emphasis on recognizing the contributions of social and behavioral science research and practice to enhance public health.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Mon 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.          Semester: Summer

This course introduces the methods for analyzing biomedical and health-related data using ANOVA methods. The course will involve one-way and two-way ANOVA with fixed and/or random effects and sample size/power calculation. And Logistic and Poisson regression models will also be addressed. The students will learn how to apply SAS procedures PROC POWER, PROC GLM, PROC MIXED, PROC GENMOD, PROC LOGISTIC and PROC GLIMMIX and interpret the results of the analysis. Emphasis will also be placed on the development of critical thinking skills. 

This course will examine the interplay of race, socio-economic status, and interest group politics in the formulation and implementation of U.S. federal and state environmental policy through film (popular film and television, documentaries, etc.). We will consider the proposition that people of color and socio-economically disadvantaged individuals bear a disproportionate burden of environmental pollution and its health consequences. We will consider the viewpoint that within the United States, as well as globally, a pattern of environmental inequity, injustice and racism exists. Key topics to be considered during the course include racism and social justice, environmental racism, pollution impacts and health effects in communities of color and rural communities, risk assessment, community responses to environmental threats, pollution in developing nations, indigenous peoples, and climate change. The possible causes for patterns of injustice and community-led interventions will be examined and discussed.

Credit Hours: 3              Class Meets: Wed. 5:30 - 8:00 p.m.           Semester: Summer     


The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.
The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.
The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
The Promotor(a) or Community Health Worker Training and Certification Program provides leadership to enhance the development and implementation of statewide training and certification standards and administrative rules for persons who act as promotores or community health workers, instructors and sponsoring institutions/training programs.

An introduction to using Moodle.

Grantsmanship: Getting the Competitive Edge. A slideshow adapted from a PowerPoint presentation given by Dr. Steven Idell to the BMR Faculty on Jan 28, 2003.

Use the enrollment key "Grantsmanship" to self-enroll.

This course contains information and forms necessary for the first year UTHSCT students.

Free instructional videos and tutorials from Learn Moodle 3.3 (https://learn.moodle.net/my/). Use the key LearnMoodle to self enroll. Completion of the all four quizzes (80% or better required to mark as complete) will earn you a myUTMoodle Badge!

This training is provided and intended for use by The University of Texas System employees and volunteers and personnel of third-party camps using The University of Texas System property for camps and programs for minors. It is derived from Texas state statues as well as policies found within The University of Texas System.

This course is a set of self-paced tutorials and resources intended for use by UT Health Northeast employees who self-enroll.

Educational Curriculum for the Family Medicine rotations

All data and forms to assist faculty in advising.