Available courses

Students in BIOT 5101 will present a research paper or their thesis research progress to faculty and peers. Each student enrolled in BIOT 5331 or BIOT 5332 must present a paper of his/her research each semester enrolled as scheduling permits. Seminars are formal PowerPoint presentations. Students in BIOT 6101 will present their thesis research progress to faculty and peers. Each student enrolled in BIOT 6331 or BIOT 6332 must present his/her research each semester enrolled as scheduling permits. The student should have a committee meeting following the seminar. Seminars are formal PowerPoint presentations in preparation for a thesis defense.

Credit Hours: 1          Class meets: Wed 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.     Room: BMR Auditorium          Semester: Fall/Spring


Classroom: BMR Auditorium

This course exposes students to current research published in major scientific journals. Students will learn how to read and interpret methodologies and results published by other scientists. This course will provide the student with a thorough understanding of the strengths and limitations of scientific writing. This course is the first of a two-course sequence and introduces the student to basic organization of scientific papers and how to identify the questions being addressed based on the scientific method.

Credit hours: 1          Class meets: Mon., 12 - 1 p.m.           Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR 116.1

The goal of the course is to provide a critical understanding of the relationship between structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids.

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Mon., 9 - 11:30 a.m.           Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR 116.1

The goal of the course is to provide a critical understanding of the relationship between structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. The Lab component of this course will give the students hands-on experience in using molecular modeling programs to learn how to manipulate protein structures, performing docking simulations, and graphically display proteins and nucleic acids structures.

 Credit hours: 2          Class meets: Mon 1:30pm - 5:30pm          Semester: Spring

Classroom: Academic Center, G3212

Lecture Component. The primary objective of this course is for the student to gain an understanding of the metabolic processes in bacteria, plants and animal cells and how metabolism is affected by enzymes, substrates, other metabolites and by bio-production of commercial products.

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Tue., 9 - 11:30 a.m.           Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR 116.1

Lab Component. The primary objective of this course is for the student to gain an understanding of the metabolic processes in bacteria, plants and animal cells and how metabolism is affected by enzymes, substrates, other metabolites and by bio-production of commercial products.

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Tue 1:30 - 5:30 p.m.          Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR Lab B4

A comprehensive study of protein chemistry applications and techniques as they relate to biotechnology. The topics covered in this course include protein purification, protein characterization, binding studies and proteomics.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Fri., 9:00a.m. - 5:00p.m.          Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR Lab B4

This course provides advanced study of the complex and fragmented delivery systems for providing healthcare in the United States including their origins, defining characteristics and current challenges. 

Credit Hours: 3          Class Meets: Tues., 6-9 p.m.          Rotation: Even          Semester: Spring 2020

Classroom: H104

This course examines the structure and functioning of the finance components of the public health system. Public health organizations will be discussed within the context of the financial environment that includes financial management, managerial accounting, revenue cycle management and funding and financial management of grants/contracts. The course also examines key financial tools and analyses for financially related decision making within the principles of strategic management applied to public health organizations amid a dynamic changing environment. 

Credit Hours: 3          Class Meets: Wed., 6-9 p.m.          Rotation: Odd          Semester: Spring 2020

Classroom: H226

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to legal issues in public health and healthcare. Basic legal principles underlying the legal system, governmental regulation, development of legal rules, and how to interact effectively with the legal system as a public health practitioner will be explored. This course has two main purposes: first, to examine the legal context of the relationship between the individual and the community; and second, to understand public health regulation in the context of a market-driven system. 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the history and current applications of social and behavioral sciences as they are applied to public health practice and research. It explores social and behavioral science models, theories, and approaches that inform public health, and their philosophical roots. The course also examines social and behavioral determinants of health equity across the ecological spectrum. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills to help students synthesize and utilize information in research and practice. An important contribution of this course is the emphasis on recognizing the contributions of social and behavioral science research and practice to enhance public health.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Thurs., 6 - 9 p.m.          Rotation: Even          Semester: Spring 2020

Classroom: H104

This course will provide students with a strong foundation in public health surveillance of health conditions and risk factors. The course will teach the theory and practice of surveillance supported by many examples of surveillance systems from the developed and developing world. The class will build on and reinforce basic epidemiologic concepts. Students will be given the opportunity to design and evaluate a surveillance system. 

Credit Hours: 3          Class Meets: Tues., 6-9 p.m.          Rotation: Even          Semester: Spring 2020

Classroom: H226

The course offers an in-depth practical and conceptual approach to fundamental statistics. The course consists of learning a variety of procedures commonly used for testing hypotheses, learning to examine and analyze the data accordingly, and learning to communicate the research results to others. By the end of the course the student will be able to create a database, properly code and screen data and present results (SPSS or another statistical software package); determine and describe the strength of association and direction of relationships between two or more variables by identifying and computing appropriate statistical tests, such as chi-square statistics, correlation coefficients, and linear regression models and by writing up results; examine and present significant mean differences between and within groups by identifying and computing appropriate statistical tests, such as t-tests and analysis of variance models (ANOVA) and by writing up results. 

Credit Hours: 3          Class meets: Mon 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.          Rotation: ODD          Semester: Spring 2020

Classroom: H105

This course presents basic statistical concepts and methods commonly used to make evidence-based decisions in business settings, with a focus on healthcare applications. This course will cover commonly used statistical tools needed by healthcare executives. During the course, techniques to collect, summarize, analyze, and interpret business-related data will be reviewed. Topics in this course may include defining and formulating problems, formulating and testing hypotheses, sampling and sampling distributions, creating descriptive statistics, statistical inference and using the results to make decisions. 

Credit Hours: 3          Class Meets: Tues., 6-9 p.m.          Rotation: ODD          Semester: Spring 2020

Classroom: H226

This course will develop the foundations of quality and process improvement that lead to higher levels of efficacy, efficiency and effectiveness in health organizations and programs. This course will explore the basis of Quality Improvement (QI) consisting of systematic and continuous actions that lead to measurable improvement in health care services and the health status of targeted patient groups. The methodology of the course will begin with “how things are done now,” considering health care performance as defined by an organization's efficiency and outcome of care, and level of patient satisfaction. Quality is directly linked to an organization's service delivery approach or underlying systems of care throughout the continuum of care. The student will understand that to achieve a different level of performance (i.e., results) and improve quality and efficacy, an organization's current system needs to change. Lastly, this course will focus on a successful QI culture that incorporates the following four key principles: QI work as systems and processes; Focus on patients and community groups, especially rural areas; Focus on being part of the team, and Focus on use of the data and analyses of information.

Credit Hours: 3                   Semester: Fall

The course provides a comprehensive introduction and overview to health policy, administration and management with specific emphasis on public health and healthcare organizations that deliver care. An additional focus is on rural communities within the context of health administration. The course context is based on managerial decision making and the practical knowledge, tools, processes and strategies required by organizational management. This course overviews the basics of administration, including public health law, human resources management, budgeting and financing, health information management, performance measurement and improvement, ethics, leadership, communication, media relations, and legislative relations. Emerging areas of public health policy and management are also discussed as contexts to apply practical knowledge, tools, and strategies.

Credit Hours: 3          Class Meets: Wed., 6-9 p.m.          Rotation: Even          Semester: Spring 2020

Classroom: H226
The principles of risk assessment and the process of risk analyses as they pertain to Environmental Health. Risk assessment can be defined as the process of assigning magnitudes and probabilities to the adverse effects of human activities or natural catastrophes. This course will describe procedures for assessing the risk presented by various risk factors. These risk factors can be physical, chemical, biological, cultural and/or socioeconomic in nature. The students will learn techniques for assessing risk given a group of alternatives.

Credit Hours: 3          Class Meets: Tues., 6-9 p.m.          Rotation: Odd          Semester: Spring 2020
Classroom: H211
This course provides an overview of public health issues in rural populations and is designed to give students an understanding of the influence of rurality on health. Topics covered include rural health disparities, policy directions in rural health, and models of rural health service delivery. Practical public health strategies that lessen the severity of impact on rural populations related to lack of access to care, substance abuse, mental health, farm safety and unintentional injuries will be explored.

Credit Hours: 3          Class Meets: Mon., 6-9 p.m.          Rotation: Even          Semester: Spring 2020
Classroom: H105

This course focuses on disease by organ systems, toxicology, and physical and biological hazards. The course includes discussion questions on the online learning management system and a case scenario.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Thurs., 6-9 p.m.          Rotation: ODD          Semester: Spring

Classroom: H104
The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
This is a continuation and culmination of the capstone project requirement for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
This is a continuation and culmination or the capstone project requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.

An introduction to using Moodle.

Grantsmanship: Getting the Competitive Edge. A slideshow adapted from a PowerPoint presentation given by Dr. Steven Idell to the BMR Faculty on Jan 28, 2003.

Use the enrollment key "Grantsmanship" to self-enroll.

An introduction to using Moodle.

Free instructional videos and tutorials from Learn Moodle 3.3 (https://learn.moodle.net/my/). Use the key LearnMoodle to self enroll. Completion of the all four quizzes (80% or better required to mark as complete) will earn you a myUTMoodle Badge!

Classroom: Online
This training is provided and intended for use by The University of Texas System employees and volunteers and personnel of third-party camps using The University of Texas System property for camps and programs for minors. It is derived from Texas state statues as well as policies found within The University of Texas System.
Classroom: Online

This course focuses on disease by organ systems, toxicology, and physical and biological hazards. The course includes discussion questions on the online learning management system and a case scenario.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Thurs., 6-9 p.m.          Rotation: ODD          Semester: Spring

All data and forms to assist faculty in advising. 

Educational Curriculum for the Family Medicine rotations

To try out and experiment with tools/features in Moodle.