Available courses

Students in BIOT 5101 will present a research paper or their thesis research progress to faculty and peers. Each student enrolled in BIOT 5331 or BIOT 5332 must present a paper of his/her research each semester enrolled as scheduling permits. Seminars are formal PowerPoint presentations. Students in BIOT 6101 will present their thesis research progress to faculty and peers. Each student enrolled in BIOT 6331 or BIOT 6332 must present his/her research each semester enrolled as scheduling permits. The student should have a committee meeting following the seminar. Seminars are formal PowerPoint presentations in preparation for a thesis defense.

Credit Hours: 1          Class meets: Wed 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.     Room: BMR Auditorium          Semester: Fall/Spring


This course exposes students to current research published in major scientific journals. Students will learn how to read and interpret methodologies and results published by other scientists. Although this is the second of a two-course sequence, the first course (Critical Reading I) is not a prerequisite. This course is team taught with a different instructor facilitating the discussion each week on a topical paper of choice.

Credit hours: 1          Class meets: Tue 9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.      Room: 116.1          Semester: Fall

Independent study of an emerging technique or technology in the field of biotechnology.

Credit hours: 1          Class meets: Tue 10:00 a.m. - 11:30 p.m.      Room: 116.1         Semester: Fall

An introduction to standard molecular biology techniques such as isolation and purification of proteins and nucleic acids, cloning and expression of recombinant proteins with laboratory component. Co-requisite: BIOT 5211L

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Mon 9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.     Room: 116.1       Semester: Fall/Spring

Graduate-level course of biotechnological aspects of gene expression, transcription control mechanisms; molecular cloning, and its applications to biotechnology at the molecular level. The student will gain a thorough understanding of fundamental molecular biochemical principles used in biotechnology, including basic background information, theory and applications.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Mon 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.      Room: 116.1          Semester: Fall

A comprehensive study of molecular biology applications and techniques as they relate to biotechnology. The topics covered in this course include mRNA isolation and Northern blotting, gene cloning, mutation of DNA, real-time quantitative PCR, bioinformatics, expression of recombinant proteins, large-scale production of proteins through fermentation and generation of transgenic animals.

Credit Hours: 3          Class meets: Thur 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.     Room: 116.1 and Lab B4         Semester: Fall

Advanced survey of the immune system with focus on the human and mouse models. Covers the origin and differentiation of the hematopoietic system, antibody structure and function, T cell subsets and the function of each subset, and the role of innate and adaptive immunity in the response to infection.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Mon, Wed  9:00a.m. - 11:30a.m.          Semester: Summer

Basic cell culture techniques with a focus on mammalian cell lines. The course will cover the basic requirements of cells grown in culture, sterile technique for handling cells and methods for transforming and separating cells. 


Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Mon, Thu*  9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.          Semester: Summer

*Thursday class time will only be for passaging cells, as may be required.

Instrumental analysis of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. Methods may include liquid chromatography; UV/Visible spectroscopy; mass spectrometry; X-ray diffraction of proteins and nucleic acids; NMR; Fluorescence cell sorter; CT scanning. 


Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Fri 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.          Semester: Summer

This course provides advanced study of the complex and fragmented delivery systems for providing healthcare in the United States including their origins, defining characteristics and current challenges. 

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to legal issues in public health and healthcare. Basic legal principles underlying the legal system, governmental regulation, development of legal rules, and how to interact effectively with the legal system as a public health practitioner will be explored. This course has two main purposes: first, to examine the legal context of the relationship between the individual and the community; and second, to understand public health regulation in the context of a market-driven system. 

Given the integration of data, community needs and regulation and policy, this course incorporates the elements of healthcare, public health, health information technology and the health insurance sub-industries to develop a framework and analytic methods to improve efficiency, effectiveness and efficacy of the health industry as a whole.  

The course will establish an analytic framework, based on data from patients, populations, processes and profitability (4 P's of Health Analytics) utilizing industry, healthcare enterprise and community health data with appropriate tools, methods and approaches to answer community health needs and status, operational, financial and healthcare delivery outcomes questions to support leadership decisions. The course will also include an integrated platform of appropriate analytical and predictive/estimation methods, tools and techniques for enhanced decision making at the strategic and operational levels of the health enterprise for enhanced health status and improved health outcomes of communities served. 

Credit Hours: 3                           Class Meets: Tues, 5:30 - 8:30 p.m.                           Semester: Summer

This course is designed to familiarize students with the history and current applications of social and behavioral sciences as they are applied to public health practice and research. It explores social and behavioral science models, theories, and approaches that inform public health, and their philosophical roots. The course also examines social and behavioral determinants of health equity across the ecological spectrum. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills to help students synthesize and utilize information in research and practice. An important contribution of this course is the emphasis on recognizing the contributions of social and behavioral science research and practice to enhance public health.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Mon 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.          Semester: Summer

COMH 6330 is intended to provide MPH students with a solid foundation and understanding of research methods and topics with enhanced capacity to produce and critically appraise public health research and literature. Students will learn the basic concepts and procedures to conduct evidence-based research addressing behavioral/social determinants of health. The course provides a concrete knowledge base to design conceptually sound and methodologically rigorous research proposals and/or evaluate behavioral/social interventions addressing public health problems. It covers a wide range of methodologies from observational studies to randomized controlled trials and non-randomized evaluations. The emphasis will be on developing a methodological literacy that allows students to understand the strengths of various methods and their common uses in public health research. 

This course focuses on health problems and issues and public health methods that have a major social or behavioral component. It is intended for the student with little background in the behavioral sciences. The course will enable students to describe one or two core theoretical perspectives from each of the social science disciplines of psychology, sociology, and anthropology, and their application to public health. The course will cover the major social and behavioral science models used in health promotion and disease prevention. The course will also cover existing social inequalities in health status related to race, social class, and gender, and the critical intersection between social risk factors, behavioral risk factors, and the development and implementation of public health interventions.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Monday  6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.          Semester: Fall

This course introduces the methods for analyzing biomedical and health-related data using ANOVA methods. The course will involve one-way and two-way ANOVA with fixed and/or random effects and sample size/power calculation. And Logistic and Poisson regression models will also be addressed. The students will learn how to apply SAS procedures PROC POWER, PROC GLM, PROC MIXED, PROC GENMOD, PROC LOGISTIC and PROC GLIMMIX and interpret the results of the analysis. Emphasis will also be placed on the development of critical thinking skills. 

This course emphasizes data management and software applications using the SAS (Statistical Analysis System) software package. It will introduce the student to SAS codes for: inputting and outputting data, creating temporary and permanent data sets, creating formatted and labeled SAS data sets, merging and connecting SAS data sets, creating output using the TABULATE and REPORT procedures, debugging a SAS program that includes the TABULATE, REPORT and SQL procedures, using characteristic functions in SAS, using a random number generator, probability distributions, arrays, and date and time functions. Students will also write a simple and complex query using the SQL procedure; create, populate and modify a set of tables/views using the SQL procedure; and create a SAS program which includes one or more macros. This course will cover basic relational database design and descriptive statistics in SAS. Particular focus is on applications pertaining to public health and biomedical research. 

Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health in populations and the application of this study to improve health outcomes. It is the basic science of public health. Epidemiology I is an introductory level. By the end of this course, the student will be able to define the content, uses and significance of epidemiology as a means of public health investigation; describe epidemiological approaches to defining and measuring health problems in defined populations; describe the strengths and limitations of epidemiological study designs; explain the contributions of epidemiological approaches to disease prevention, health promotion and health policy; and describe the role of epidemiological approaches in evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of health care and preventive health services. 

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Mon 2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.          Semester: Fall

This course will develop the foundations of quality and process improvement that lead to higher levels of efficacy, efficiency and effectiveness in health organizations and programs. This course will explore the basis of Quality Improvement (QI) consisting of systematic and continuous actions that lead to measurable improvement in health care services and the health status of targeted patient groups. The methodology of the course will begin with “how things are done now,” considering health care performance as defined by an organization's efficiency and outcome of care, and level of patient satisfaction. Quality is directly linked to an organization's service delivery approach or underlying systems of care throughout the continuum of care. The student will understand that to achieve a different level of performance (i.e., results) and improve quality and efficacy, an organization's current system needs to change. Lastly, this course will focus on a successful QI culture that incorporates the following four key principles: QI work as systems and processes; Focus on patients and community groups, especially rural areas; Focus on being part of the team, and Focus on use of the data and analyses of information.

Credit Hours: 3                   Semester: Fall

This course examines the dynamic nature of leadership in the healthcare and public health context utilizing organizational theory and behavior models. This course uses foundational leadership concepts to develop leadership applications and processes, such as leadership assessment (individual and team), communication improvement, strategic planning, decision making alignment, employee enhancement and knowledge management for use in creating and maintaining an organizational culture that can thrive within its external environment while improving organizational efficiency, effectiveness and efficacy within moral parameters.

Credit hours: 3           Class meets:            Semester: Fall 2019
An intensive survey course covering the essentials of toxicology including the metabolic breakdown of xenobiotic materials, acute and chronic toxicity studies mandated by the EPA in TSCA and FIFRA, and the regulatory environment that these studies impact. Credit hours: 3 Class meets: Semester: Fall 2019
This course will examine the interplay of race, socio-economic status, and interest group politics in the formulation and implementation of U.S. federal and state environmental policy through film (popular film and television, documentaries, etc.). We will consider the proposition that people of color and socio-economically disadvantaged individuals bear a disproportionate burden of environmental pollution and its health consequences. We will consider the viewpoint that within the United States, as well as globally, a pattern of environmental inequity, injustice and racism exists. Key topics to be considered during the course include racism and social justice, environmental racism, pollution impacts and health effects in communities of color and rural communities, risk assessment, community responses to environmental threats, pollution in developing nations, indigenous peoples, and climate change. The possible causes for patterns of injustice and community-led interventions will be examined and discussed.

Credit Hours: 3              Class Meets: Wed. 5:30 - 8:00 p.m.           Semester: Summer     


This is an introduction to environmental and occupational health with an emphasis on various levels of prevention and the scientific application of regulatory principles. Evaluation methods and general aspects of control measures relative to human health will also be explored. At the end of the course the student will have been acquainted with the history and basic principles of occupational and environmental health programs and how they relate; be able to review relevant legal, ethical, and regulatory issues pertinent to occupational and environmental health; and be familiar with the basic tools utilized in the evaluation of occupational and environmental health issues such as epidemiology and statistics, industrial hygiene, occupational health nursing, and toxicology. 

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Mondays 6:00pm - 9:00pm          Semester: Fall

The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.

The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.

The first of two internships to provide an opportunity for each student to work in a public health setting in a position that carries responsibility and is of particular interest. Each placement is different, but all depend upon completion of most concentration coursework, the ability to work with minimal supervision, and permission of the student’s faculty advisor. A total of 135 contact hours will have to be completed during the semester to satisfactorily complete the course.
The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
The capstone project is a requirement for graduation for students in the MPH program. The capstone is an opportunity for students to work on public health practice projects that are of particular interest to them. The goal is for students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills and competencies they have acquired to a public health problem that approximates a professional practice experience. Completion of the capstone project requires both written and oral components. The capstone is typically completed in the last two terms of the program. The project is done under the direction of a faculty member, the capstone advisor.
The Promotor(a) or Community Health Worker Training and Certification Program provides leadership to enhance the development and implementation of statewide training and certification standards and administrative rules for persons who act as promotores or community health workers, instructors and sponsoring institutions/training programs.

An introduction to using Moodle.

Grantsmanship: Getting the Competitive Edge. A slideshow adapted from a PowerPoint presentation given by Dr. Steven Idell to the BMR Faculty on Jan 28, 2003.

Use the enrollment key "Grantsmanship" to self-enroll.

This course contains information and forms necessary for the first year UTHSCT students.

Free instructional videos and tutorials from Learn Moodle 3.3 (https://learn.moodle.net/my/). Use the key LearnMoodle to self enroll. Completion of the all four quizzes (80% or better required to mark as complete) will earn you a myUTMoodle Badge!

This training is provided and intended for use by The University of Texas System employees and volunteers and personnel of third-party camps using The University of Texas System property for camps and programs for minors. It is derived from Texas state statues as well as policies found within The University of Texas System.

All data and forms to assist faculty in advising. 

Educational Curriculum for the Family Medicine rotations

To try out and experiment with tools/features in Moodle.