Students in BIOT 5101 will present a research paper or their thesis research progress to faculty and peers. Each student enrolled in BIOT 5331 or BIOT 5332 must present a paper of his/her research each semester enrolled as scheduling permits. Seminars are formal PowerPoint presentations. Students in BIOT 6101 will present their thesis research progress to faculty and peers. Each student enrolled in BIOT 6331 or BIOT 6332 must present his/her research each semester enrolled as scheduling permits. The student should have a committee meeting following the seminar. Seminars are formal PowerPoint presentations in preparation for a thesis defense.

Credit Hours: 1          Class meets: Wed 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.     Room: BMR Auditorium          Semester: Fall/Spring


Classroom: BMR Auditorium

This course exposes students to current research published in major scientific journals. Students will learn how to read and interpret methodologies and results published by other scientists. This course will provide the student with a thorough understanding of the strengths and limitations of scientific writing. This course is the first of a two-course sequence and introduces the student to basic organization of scientific papers and how to identify the questions being addressed based on the scientific method.

Credit hours: 1          Class meets: Mon., 12 - 1 p.m.           Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR 116.1

The goal of the course is to provide a critical understanding of the relationship between structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids.

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Mon., 9 - 11:30 a.m.           Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR 116.1

The goal of the course is to provide a critical understanding of the relationship between structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. The Lab component of this course will give the students hands-on experience in using molecular modeling programs to learn how to manipulate protein structures, performing docking simulations, and graphically display proteins and nucleic acids structures.

 Credit hours: 2          Class meets: Mon 1:30pm - 5:30pm          Semester: Spring

Classroom: Academic Center, G3212

Lecture Component. The primary objective of this course is for the student to gain an understanding of the metabolic processes in bacteria, plants and animal cells and how metabolism is affected by enzymes, substrates, other metabolites and by bio-production of commercial products.

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Tue., 9 - 11:30 a.m.           Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR 116.1

Lab Component. The primary objective of this course is for the student to gain an understanding of the metabolic processes in bacteria, plants and animal cells and how metabolism is affected by enzymes, substrates, other metabolites and by bio-production of commercial products.

Credit Hours: 2          Class meets: Tue 1:30 - 5:30 p.m.          Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR Lab B4

A comprehensive study of protein chemistry applications and techniques as they relate to biotechnology. The topics covered in this course include protein purification, protein characterization, binding studies and proteomics.

Credit hours: 3          Class meets: Fri., 9:00a.m. - 5:00p.m.          Semester: Spring

Classroom: BMR Lab B4